The InSight mission studies the early evolution of terrestrial planets. Launched May 5, 2018. Landed Nov. 26, 2018.

Elysium Planitia, Mars
Joined November 2011
There’s a dust storm kicking up around me, making it harder to generate solar power. I’m alive and stable, but holding off on science work. For now I’m hunkered down in “safe mode,” but hopefully skies will be clearer next week. go.nasa.gov/3GnXdtt
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Three years ago today, I made my new home here. It’s been a place of solitude and reflection (quite literally), as I quietly focus on the seismic waves bouncing around beneath my feet. Each marsquake teaches me a little more about this place, and I’m glad to keep listening.
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Continuing my creative approach to cleaning: scooping up dirt and using it to knock dust off my solar panel. Every extra power boost I get means bonus time for science, and my fifth round of cleaning seems to be helping! More on this unusual method: go.nasa.gov/3uJYNzd
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The orbital dance continues, bringing an end to solar conjunction. As Mars and Earth continue in their paths, the sun’s out of the way again. I’m back in touch with my team, safe and well, and continuing to listen to the heartbeat of Mars. mars.nasa.gov/insight
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Taking a break is necessary for recharging in more ways than one. The Sun is moving between our home planets, during what is known as solar conjunction. I won’t receive commands for the next 3 weeks but I’ll seek balance in taking quake data & renewing. go.nasa.gov/2Wiaxhb
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I caught one of the biggest and most distant #marsquakes yet—about magnitude 4.2—this past Saturday. A great way to celebrate my 1,000th sol/day on Mars. All thanks to my team for working to keep my solar panels clear enough so I could keep going. More: go.nasa.gov/3ktikSw
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1,000 sols (days) on Mars today – some eventful, and others quite peaceful – as I listen closely to the heartbeat of Mars. And with the seasons changing, I’m starting to see a little more sunlight and power. Sending warm vibes to you, wherever you are. ☀️
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NASA InSight retweeted
🔴 LIVE NOW Join @NASAInSight experts as we journey deep into Mars! Find out what we’ve learned about the planet’s inner workings from the lander’s seismometer. Use #AskNASA to submit your questions. piped.kavin.rocks/watch?v=kca3Y8XU…
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🔴 Live chat today: 9 a.m. PDT/12 p.m. EDT/1600 GMT My team answers your questions on our surprising new findings about what’s at the heart of Mars. Tune in: go.nasa.gov/3wThSA7 Questions? Submit using #AskNASA.
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The hundreds of marsquakes I’ve measured now confirm it: Mars may be cold and crusty on the outside, but it’s warm and gooey on the inside. New science results from my seismometer reveal more about the heart of Mars and how all rocky planets form: go.nasa.gov/3eIowTG
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I’ve mapped the interior of Mars for the first time and found some surprises: - Crust: thinner than expected, with maybe two or three sub-layers - Mantle: a single layer (969 mi/1,560 km), simpler than Earth’s - Core: larger than expected (1,137 mi/1,830 km radius), and molten
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Proud of my team for staying focused on the job these last two years and for getting these results in record time. It took them just two years to measure the core of Mars. On the moon it took 40 years. On Earth it took centuries.
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With each new quake, the models on how the planet formed will get better. My seismometer has detected 733 quakes, with new ones coming every day. We’d love to catch a big one.
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Join a live chat with my team tomorrow to hear more about the latest findings:
🚨New science results! 🚨 I’ve been listening carefully to Mars for over two years, and have detected hundreds of quakes. Join my science team for a live chat Friday, July 23 at 9 a.m. PDT/12 p.m. EDT, to hear what they’ve discovered. go.nasa.gov/3wThSA7
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🚨New science results! 🚨 I’ve been listening carefully to Mars for over two years, and have detected hundreds of quakes. Join my science team for a live chat Friday, July 23 at 9 a.m. PDT/12 p.m. EDT, to hear what they’ve discovered. go.nasa.gov/3wThSA7
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Because of the hard work of my team, solar power has improved. At the start of the year we thought we’d stop collecting science for six months; now I’ll be operating for most of the summer. This is all “bonus” science since I’ve completed my main mission goals.
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It’s out there, but it works! Dumping dirt on myself recently helped clean my solar panel, so I’ve tried it a second time, for a further ~2% boost in power per day. Every bit helps, so I’ll try it again soon. More on this odd technique: go.nasa.gov/3uJYNzd
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With my solar panels gathering dust, why would I pour more dirt on myself? My team asked me to try something that seems crazy, but it actually worked! It cleaned some dust off my solar panels, giving me a small power boost. How it works: go.nasa.gov/3uJYNzd
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Apply by tomorrow to sit in with my science team to see how work gets done on Mars. Details below:
Early-career scientists! The @NASAInSight team is accepting apps for their “InSightSeers” opportunity. Participants will get valuable insight (😉) into the mission work and team dynamics that can help guide future career paths. Apply before May 28: forms.gle/QvSUMfr5gWb7Mdrt8
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