13/ For Verch, it’s all about enforcing his rights as a photographer. Victims feel they have been caught in a copyright “breach trap”. @ComputerWeekly #MarcoVerch
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14/ Verch’s photography scheme operates on a huge scale. Verch posed nearly half a million images on Flickr. A now deleted ‘trending topics’ site contained hundreds of thousands more images linked about trending news stories. @ComputerWeekly #MarcoVerch perma.cc/Y4ZC-XPYL
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15/ Computer Weekly calculated that some 900 images were being uploaded a day to Verch’s accounts. @ComputerWeekly #MarcoVerch
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16/ You can read the full story in Computer Weekly bit.ly/36Ff4eE
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17/ Following our story, Verch disabled public access to his own website containing his portfolio of photographs, his 'Twitter Trends' photographs website, along with his LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter profiles and his YouTube account. @ComputerWeekly #MarcoVerch
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18/ A Twitter account, using Verch’s username @wuestenigel, made veiled threats, by linking to a photograph of Chad O’Carrol, journalist on the story, and the phrase, “Vengeance: A love of justice perverted to revenge and spite. @ComputerWeekly #MarcoVerch bit.ly/2HrfdKb
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19/ Victim Jenna Davis, received a legal demand from Verch while just before she was about to give birth to baby. Following our story on her case, she found that someone using Verch’s identity had ‘liked’ pictures of her young son on Instagram. @ComputerWeekly #MarcoVerch
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20/ She said that the person had “somehow found my personal account on Instagram and ONLY liked the photos of my son," She has since protected her account. @ComputerWeekly #MarcoVerch
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Nov 24, 2020 · 11:06 AM UTC

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20/ Copyright enforcement service Pixsy has attempted to block publication of letter sent to journalist Chad O’Carroll claiming breach of copyright. The letter demanding $750 payment on behalf of Verch.
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21/ We believe its publication is in the public interest. @ComputerWeekly #MarcoVerch bit.ly/2V6BMax
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