do you know lisp and music theory and maybe have a soup癟on of weirdo computer-human-interaction chops? i have a question!
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if you wanted to read aloud a bit of lisp (not much, mostly just smaller code samples), and wanted to convey the meaning of the parens, how would you do it?
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i was thinking a chord sequence that played in the background depending on the depth -- so the chord would change up at every ( and return down at every ) but maybe there's also a way to convey the position within a sexp too? or is that info overload and not useful?

2:18 AM 繚 Oct 27, 2020

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i just want to avoid going openparen openparen openparen without conveying any long-lasting info
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(please retweet if you have lisp-music-lovin' friends too)
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Replying to @mala
Man, a friend is just digging into G繹del, Escher, Bach and I can't help thinking this is a perfect question for Hofstadter
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Replying to @mala
How about adding notes to a chord for each level of parens? Start with a C (or whatever) for the first open paren. Then add a E for the next. Then G, B, D, etc. You get deeply nested and you get fancy jazz chords. Then take notes away as the parens are closed.
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This seems to be the growing consensus! I hope I don't have to learn how to sing
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Replying to @mala
Cool yes you could go to a higher inversion of the chord each level of nesting. Or, put a subtle band pass filter over your voice and sweep it up with each ( and down with each ). I think it makes sense to stay in one key (to avoid distraction) and use the harmonics to show depth
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I very much applaud this line of thinking. I do a lot of visualization for genomics and I have thought a bit about how sonification is woefully under-used compared to viz. Time for a spontaneous conference perhaps
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Replying to @mala
I added a reverb that got longer with nesting level. Wasn't very audible though.
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