Associate prof of law & sociology @Yale. South Carolinian by heart, Yankee by location. She.

New York, NY
Joined September 2008
Monica Bell retweeted
I asked too many academic bitches to edit my law review article and now I am in this google doc FIGHTING FOR MY LIFE
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Monica Bell retweeted
(1/9) Our new article on police-related fear (with @agrahamphd) shows that Black and White Americans live in different emotional worlds. This thread summarizes our findings. onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/… Data, code, and preprint available @socarxiv and at: osf.io/tgq9b/
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🎉🎉🎉 Huge congratulations to @EtienneT_Esq and to my amazing friend and law school classmate Tianna Gibbs of @UDCLaw for this well-deserved honor!!
Congratulations to Tianna Gibbs and Etienne Toussaint @EtienneT_Esq for receiving SALT's Junior Faculty Award @udclaw @UofSC 🥂
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This book looks super-fascinating (and probably maddening and depressing —but we shall see.) Congratulations!!
it’s publication day for the latest scorpio 🦂 in my life, my book, the politics of surviving with @ucpress !!! the book is about how women who have experienced #domesticviolence are pressured to show they’re “good survivors” to get life-saving resources
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In this new paper in Journal of Economic Perspectives, I make three arguments about the future of public safety research. Research has often been limited in scope and outmoded in its assumptions. TLDR: 🧵 aeaweb.org/articles?id=10.12…
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1: Researchers should probe the effects of policing on more outcomes—education, health, community flourishing, subjective well-being, etc. There's already research like this afoot (much cited), but most databases that quant crim scholars use don't facilitate such studies.
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Just as "law of policing" has been inappropriately limited to criminal procedure in legal scholarship (see work by @rharmonlaw, @policelawprof, @johnmrappaport, others), quant social science of policing has largely examined crime variables, neglecting other community outcomes.
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2: New public safety research should evaluate community-based strategies of harm deterrence and accountability. Quant social scientists rarely study these policing alternatives. This neglect biases the evidence base that informs policy, inevitably reaffirming the status quo.
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3: New public safety research should investigate the effects of racism on crime, harm, and disparity in the criminal system. Research on racial disparities is routinely oblivious to the institutional contexts of race, leaving researchers unable to make sense of their findings.
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Finally, I make a few framing points about how social scientists should approach their work on policing and the criminal system—with circumspection and humility.
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Evidence-based policymaking is often backward-looking and timid. Reimagination of systems has to be forward-looking and bold. Researchers who study innovative safety projects must be careful about how to interpret “failure” from a traditional evaluative perspective.
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Social scientists should approach policy research with awareness that, while empirical research is an extremely valuable tool, it can't and shouldn't be an exclusive, overly determinative tool in moral and political debates over public safety.
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This is a set of points I started developing last summer in an essay for @just_security and will keep trying to work out in the forthcoming volume, "Racing National Security," edited by the brilliant @matiangai. justsecurity.org/71418/black…
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Scholars who review articles, evaluate proposals, and vote on appointments should reflect upon—and where appropriate, change—assumptions about what constitutes rigorous research. E.g., research in partnership w/ community orgs may be labelled “activism," imposing career costs.
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Funders might also have a role to play in facilitating broader research by funding community harm prevention and response work in ways that better facilitate data-gathering and causal identification.
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Social science expertise, while vast in some ways, is limited in others. Sometimes, data will simply be insufficient to answer the burning questions of our day. Then, we should pause & perhaps question where our findings fit in a larger ecosystem of transformation and justice.
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Very grateful to the editors for making me a part of this issue on the criminal system, alongside @ProfEmilyOwens and @bocar_a, Will Dobbie and Crystal Yang, @profjensludwig and @m_sendhil, and @westernbruce.
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The essay itself isn't super-long and cites a lot of work by amazing researchers in this field. If you read it, please share your thoughts, even if (especially if) you disagree with some of this or think the essay misses something important!
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Predictably, @aaronsibarium and @FreeBeacon’s efforts have already caused reputational and emotional harm. One detractor claims that Yaseen’s alleged “push” for this trainer (which didn’t happen) “is why Israelis kill Arabs on a daily basis.”
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Now, @aaronsibarium has posted this defamatory tweet—actually an untrue course of events. This is a lie.
NEW: The YLS administrator at the center of Traphouse-gate pushed the Yale Law Journal to host a diversity trainer who said anti-Semitism is merely a form of anti-blackness and suggested the FBI artificially inflates the number of anti-Semitic hate crimes. bit.ly/3pZ5oXZ
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