Twitter cut off the ability to read a tweet by fetching its URL with a normal HTTP GET. You need Javascript or an authenticated API call. I know most people don't care. It's normal web browsing, with all the data-hoovering we've come to expect. Just want to say that it matters.
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(Yes, there's footnotes that didn't fit in the tweet. I think you can use an API call from a registered twitter client but which is technically unauthenticated. I will probably set something like this up as a command-line tool.)
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But I agree, the removal of that feature matters. It makes Twitter a less attractive, more hostile place to be. It makes me question why I'm contributing value to company opposed to my values, every time I use it. *looks over at mastodon*
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Overheard at @TwitterDev: "It wasn't a feature, it was a bug . . . um, a bug that got us more clicks? Oops. Whose idea was this?"
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Can you all explain how this is an issue for your apps - given React is so popular on the web now - I’d love to understand what deliberately hostile change has been made, and why the basic HTTP methods affect how you use the API, which is not affected by the front end choices?
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I see this topic has gotten some nerd-play so I will try to answer this briefly: The point of the web is that a public URL refers to information. You can GET it. There may be all sorts of elaboration and metadata and extra services, but that HTTP GET always works.

7:09 AM · Dec 18, 2020

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Tools rely on this. Blogs pull previews via HTTP. RSS readers collect and collate posts. People peek pages using fast or low-bandwidth tools. It's not part of any company's value proposition or stock price; it just works. Until somebody breaks it.
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The error message that appears now when I do this on Twitter (and the warning that popped up a few weeks ago) says that Twitter is dropping support for legacy browsers. But you support legacy browsers with an HTTP reply that contains the tweet text. That's all.
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